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Press Contact
Michelle Moody
Moody & Associates
+1-214-363-3460
 

CAP-XX Photo Gallery

Product Photos – G Series: General Purpose Supercapacitors
Product Photos – H Series: HighTemperature Supercapacitors
Product Photos – G & H Series: Side Views
CAP-XX Product Comparison Photos
iExpander for iPhone 4 and iPhone 5 Powered by BritetFlash™
CAP-XX Supercapacitors for Automotive Applications
BritePower™ Solutions/Devices Using Supercapacitors
High-Power LED BriteFlash™ vs Xenon: Camera Phone Flash Comparison
BriteFlash™ Power Architecture for High-Power LED Flash
BriteSound™ Power Architecture for Music Phones


Note: Low Resolution images are displayed. To view and save High Resolution images, click on the "High Res" link where it appears, right click on the image, and select "Save Image As" to save the larger image to your hard disk. Please be patient as some images are quite large.


Product Photos – G Series: General Purpose Supercapacitors Product Details  
GS Family - High Res
CAP-XX GS108 Supercapacitor
GS103
GS106
GS108
GS203
GS206
GS208
GS211
GW Family - High Res
CAP-XX GW109 Supercapacitor
GW101
GW107
GW109
GW201
GW202
GW207
GW209
GZ Family - High Res
CAP-XX GZ215 Supercapacitor
GZ115
GZ215




 
 


Product Photos – H Series: High Temperature Supercapacitors Product Details  
HS Family - High Res
CAP-XX HS206 Supercapacitor
HS103
HS106
HS108
HS203
HS206
HS208
HS211
HW Family - High Res
CAP-XX HW207 Supercapacitor
HW101
HW107
HW109
HW201
HW202
HW207
HW209
HA Family - High Res
CAP-XX HA230 Supercapacitor
HA130
HA230




 
HZ Family - High Res
CAP-XX HZ202 Supercapacitor
HZ102
HZ202




 


Product Photos – G & H Series Sideviews Product Details  
GS1/HS1 Side View
CAP-XX GS1/HS1 Supercapacitor Side View
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GS2/HS2 Side View
CAP-XX GS2/HS2 Supercapacitor Side View
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GW1/HW1 Side View
CAP-XX GW1/HW1 Supercapacitor 
					Side View
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GW2/HW2 Side View
CAP-XX GW2/HW2 Supercapacitor 
					Side View
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CAP-XX Product Comparison Photos

Pictured here with a US quarter dollar, CAP-XX supercapacitors benefit from a unique nanotechnology construction, which packs the highest energy and power-densities available today into thin, lightweight, prismatic packages (as little as 1mm thick). These ultra-slim supercapacitors provide the peak power required for high brightness LED flash (BriteFlashô), enhanced audio reproduction (BriteSoundô) and many other applications (BritePowerô).

CAP-XX Supercapacitor angled view next to 
			a quarter

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The key advantage of LED Flash over Xenon in camera phones is size. An electrolytic capacitor is required for Xenon Flash and a slim supercapacitor powers an LED Flash. For instance, a SonyEricsson K800 uses two electrolytic capacitors each measuring 7mm dia. x 18mm long. The CAP-XX LED BriteFlash™ solution uses two supercapacitors measuring 17mm x 39mm x 1.1mm side by side to keep the solution very thinî
Electrolytic Can with CAP-XX GS106
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iExpander for iPhone 4 and iPhone 5 Powered by BriteFlash™


Corr-Tech has chosen BriteFlash for its new iExpander accessories for the iPhone4/4s and 5. The iExpander is a multi-functional , after-market iPhone case which offers a high-power LED flash, double the battery life, and the ability to add more SD memory - all in a sleek, graphite-reinforced nylon case which adds just over 6mm to the phone. Additionally, the iExpander for iPhone 5 supports the original 30-pin connector, ensuring that users can connect to all their existing iPhone and IPod accessories.

 

At the heart of the iExpander is an ultra-thin CAP-XX HS206 supercapacitor, driving a powerful LED flash, and delivering far more light energy than is possible with the battery alone. The result is crisp photographs and outstanding videos in low light.

 

Find out more about the iExpander for iphone at kickstarter.com  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ultra-slim and multi talented iExpander

 

Photograph from an iPhone 4 without iExpander

 

Photograph from an iPhone 4 with iExpander


iExpander PCB showing CAP-XX supercapacitor



CAP-XX Supercapacitors for Automotive Applications


CAP-XX 1100F supercapacitor cell for use in automotive stop-start and regenerative braking modules.The CAP-XX Stop-Start test modules contain 6 of these cells connected in series.
CAP-XX Automotive Supercapacitor Cell , CAP-XX 1100F
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CAP-XX Stop-Start supercapacitor module used in the New European Drive Cycle tests.
CAP-XX Automotive Stop-Start Supercapacitor Module (NEDC test)
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CAP-XX Stop-Start supercapacitor module used in the Mazda Battery Charge Acceptance test.
CAP-XX Automotive Stop-Start Module (Mazda test)
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Power architecture for the CAP-XX Stop-Start supercapacitor module. CAP-XX Automotive Stop-Start System Block Diagram
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Suggested power architecture for a CAP-XX Fuel Cell vehicle supercapacitor module. CAP-XX Automotive Fuel Cell System Block Diagram
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BritePower™ Solutions/Devices Using Supercapacitors
Powercast RF Energy Harvesting Module
This wireless power module combines Powercast's RF energy-harvesting technology with a CAP-XX supercapacitor to create a perpetual, battery-free power source for the wireless sensors commonly used in security, environmental and condition-monitoring systems. The module integrates a power receiving antenna, a Powercast Powerharvester to convert the radio waves into low DC power and a CAP-XX supercapacitor. The supercapacitor stores the harvested energy and provides peak transmission power to a wireless sensor/transmitter board such as the Texas Instruments eZ430-RF2500T. The complete module measures 8" tall x 1" wide x ¼î thick.
Contact Powercast at www.powercastco.com for more information.

Front and Back Close-up of Components
P2100 Powercast Powerharvester module with CAP-XX Supercapacitor

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Complete Module Including
Power Receiving Antenna


P2100 Powercast Powerharvester module back view with CAP-XX Supercapacitor

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Perpetuum Vibration Energy Harvesting Module
Perpetuum's PMG17 vibration energy-harvesting micro-generator, together with a CAP-XX supercapacitor, allow wireless sensor system manufacturers to design battery-free condition monitoring systems that collect and report data on machinery for improved asset management. The PMG17 microgenerator converts unused mechanical vibration into a low but steady source of electrical energy. The supercapacitor then stores the energy and delivers the peak power needed to transmit sensor condition data over wireless networks such as IEEE 802.15.4 (Zigbee) and 802.11 (WLAN). Together they can power wireless sensor nodes indefinitely. Contact Perpetuum at www.perpetuum.co.uk for more information.

Perpetuum Electricity Generator with CAP-XX Supercapacitor

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High-Power LED BriteFlash™ vs Xenon: Camera Phone Flash Comparison

Overview: This provides visuals from a 2009 study updating the company's 2006 study. Tests again showed that the LED BriteFlash approach delivers more light energy than most xenon flashes in a thin form factor suitable for slim camera phones and digital cameras. For more details and conclusions, see the press release:
http://www.cap-xx.com/news/FlashComparison.htm.

The two photographs of the girl were taken in low light from 2 meters distance to compare a small xenon flash in a current camera phone and the supercapacitor-powered LED BriteFlash™ solution:

  • Left: LG KU990 5-megapixel phone with a xenon flash unit delivers flash power so low that the girl is barely visible as a silhouette.
  • Right: Nokia N73 modified with CAP-XX BriteFlash solution - supercapacitor powers 3 LEDs at 1A each for a total flash power of 12W.
Left: LG KU990 5-megapixel phone with a xenon flash Left: Nokia N73 modified with CAP-XX BriteFlash solution
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The two photographs of the colour scene with metronome were taken in a dark room from 2 meters distance to compare a standard battery-powered LED flash in a current camera phone and BriteFlash:

  • Left: Nokia N96 with 2 LEDs but no supercapacitor support. Note the poor colour reproduction from the colour chart. There is also a metronome ticking at 1Hz to show blur due to exposure time 1/10s.
  • Right: Nokia N73 modified with CAP-XX BriteFlash solution - supercapacitor powers 3 LEDs at 1A each for a total flash power of 12W. The colour chart shows much better colour rendition and the metronome arm shows less blur from a faster exposure of 1/15s.
Left: Nokia N96 with 2 LEDs but no supercapacitor support Right: Nokia N73 modified with CAP-XX BriteFlash solution
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Light Power and Light Energy Measurements: The key to clear pictures is Light Energy - the total amount of light that fills a camera's pixels during image-capture time. On the other hand, Light Power refers to the intensity of a flash. To calculate Light Energy: Light Power (Lux) x Flash Exposure Time (Secs) = Light Energy (Lux.Secs).

  • The Xenon flash has excellent light power, but a very short flash exposure time.
  • An LED flash, powered by a supercapacitor, delivers lower light power over a longer flash exposure time for total Light Energy that exceeds most Xenon flashes.
Comparison of Light Energy between Xenon, BriteFlash and Low-Power LED Flash
 Source Storage
Capacitor
Distance
(m)
Peak Light
Power (lux)
Exposure
Time
(msecs)
Light
Energy
(lux.secs)
 Xenon
 Samsung G800
Unknown 1 303,000 <1 11.5
 Xenon
 SonyEricsson K800
2x 14µF 1 217,000 <1 15.8
 Xenon
 Nokia N82
20µF 1 161,000 <1 10.2
 Xenon
 LG KU990 (Viewty)
10µF 1 52,000 <1 2.6
 BriteFlash
 2x LEDs @ 2A each
0.55F 1 425 17 6.0
33 11.2
67 21.7
 Medium power LED Flash
 1x LED @ 1A
0.55F 1 135 67 8.9
 Low power LED flash
 2x LEDs, Nokia N96
NA 1 30 67 2.15
100 3.45
 Low power LED Flash
 1x LED, Nokia N73
NA 1 20 90 1.71
           
 Xenon
 Samsung G800
Unknown 2 72,000 <1 2.90
 Xenon
 SonyEricsson K800
2x 14µF 2 57,000 <1 4.45
 Xenon
 Nokia N82
20µF 2 40,000 <1 2.45
 Xenon
 LG KU990 (Viewty)
10µF 2 15,000 <1 0.72
 BriteFlash
 2x LEDs @ 2A each
0.55F 2 130 17 1.9
33 3.6
67 7.0
 Low power LED flash
 2x LEDs, Nokia N96
NA 2 8.2 67 0.55
100 0.86
 Low power LED Flash
 1x LED, Nokia N73
NA 2 5.0 90 0.43
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CAP-XX's Dr. Trevor Smith Sets Up Light Measurement Equipment
CAP-XX's Dr. Trevor Smith sets up light measurement equipment
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Flash Solutions Tested:

  • Xenon: SonyEricsson K800, LG KU990, Nokia N82 and Samsung G800 all with 5-megapixel cameras but with varying size electrolytic storage capacitors.
  • Standard battery-powered LEDs: Nokia N73 (3.2-megapixel) and N96 (5-megapixel).
  • Supercapacitor-powered LEDs: To demonstrate the BriteFlash approach, CAP-XX used a small, thin (20mm x 18mm x 3.8mm thick), dual-cell supercapacitor to drive a two-LED array of Philips LUXEONÆ PWM4s at 2A each or 4A total during the flash pulse.
     

Comparison of Solution Size and Energy Density
The key advantage of LED Flash over Xenon in camera phones is size. The image on the right compares the electrolytic capacitor used in the SonyEricsson K800 and the supercapacitor used for the LED Flash. The SonyEricsson K800 uses two of these electrolytic capacitors each measuring 7mm dia. x 18mm long. Similarly, the LED Flash solution uses two of these supercapacitors measuring 17mm x 39mm x 1.1mm side by side to keep the solution very thin.

Size comparison between cylindrical electrolytic storage capacitor used for Xenon flash and thin 				prismatic supercapacitor used for LED Flash
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The bulky electrolytic capacitor precludes a thin form factor for a Xenon flash solution with adequate
light energy.
Pictured is the SonyEricsson K800. The internal shot shows two electrolytics fitted inside and the other shows the electrolytic and supercapacitor in profile next to the phone.

The bulky electrolytic capacitor precludes a thin form factor for a Xenon flash solution with 
				adequate light energy The bulky electrolytic capacitor precludes a thin form factor for a Xenon flash solution with 
				adequate light energy
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Size comparison between cylindrical electrolytic storage capacitor used for Xenon flash and thin 				prismatic supercapacitor used for LED Flash
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Size comparison between prismatic supercapacitor and cylindrical electrolytic storage capacitor used for xenon flash. The SonyEricsson K800 uses two of these electrolytics; the Nokia N82 uses one of the same size.




Comparing Design Solutions for Camera-Phone Flash

Xenon
 

Supercapacitor-enabled LED flash (BriteFlash)
 
Bulky:
- Large electrolytic storage capacitor
- Total volume of xenon solution in SonyEricsson K800 ~3.8cc and 7mm thick
Small and thin:
- Prismatic supercapacitor and LEDs
- Typically < 2cc and 2 - 4mm thick 1
Fragile (Drop test):
- Xenon tube
- Electrolytic connection to flex PCB prone to fracture due to large mass of capacitors and flimsiness of PCB
Rugged (no difficulties with drop test):
- No large mass
- No fragile parts
Safety:
1.5J of energy stored at 330V can give a nasty shock, particularly near the ear
Safe:
Low voltage, no safety issues
High Voltage (HV) trigger circuit needed for xenon flash tube, > 4000V. Special measures and/or clearance is required to prevent arcing to other circuits No HV, no special steps to prevent arcing to other circuits
Mechanical shutter required to prevent overexposure: extra cost, size & power Works with a rolling shutter. No mechanical shutter required
High voltage and current pulse for xenon strobe causes Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI) High current delivered from supercap, EMI easier to manage
Still need a separate LED for video/torch mode Same LEDs used for flash and video/torch
Long time to re-charge electrolytic capacitor between photos (~8s for SonyEricsson K800) Short time to re-charge supercapacitor between photos (~2s)
Electrolytic capacitor cannot be used for any other peak-power needs Supercapacitor can be used to meet all peak power needs in the cell phone including:
- Flash pulse
- GPS readings
- RF Transmission for GPRS
- Audio
Very high-powered light delivered in > 200µsec:
- No photo blur
- Can take an action shots in low light
Light energy delivered over longer time:
- Capable of high-quality still shots, but cannot take action shot in low light
- Image stabilization software can correct for hand movement
High Res JPG Version
1Thickness will depend on implementation: two single-cell supercapacitors side by side (double the footprint and half the thickness), or a dual-cell supercapacitor with the two cells stacked on top of each other (half the footprint and double the thickness)

BriteFlash™ Power Architecture for High-Power LED Flash

Supercapacitor-Optimized LED Flash Drivers

To achieve high LED power, designers can add a thin supercapacitor to deliver peak flash-power, using the battery to cover average power needs and recharge the supercapacitor between flashes. Integrating the circuitry outlined in blue (boost converter, supercapacitor balancing, I2C interface and LED current control), new supercapacitor-optimized LED flash drivers from major IC companies such as AnalogicTech and ON Semiconductor are now available to save time, board space and component cost. A white paper explains
more at http://www.cap-xx.com/resources/pres_wp/pres_wp.htm#wp.
 

Supercapacitor-optimized LED Flash Drivers Integrate Circuitry Outlined in Blue
BriteFlash Power Architecture block diagram
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ON Semi CAT3224 Supercap Optimized LED Flash Driver IC ON Semi NCP5680 Supercap Optimized LED Flash Driver IC HiRes.jpg AAT1282 Supercap Optimized LED Flash Driver IC
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Contact AnalogicTech at analogictech.com or OnSemi at onsemi.com for more information.

Supercapacitor-enabled LED Flash Modules
This supercapacitor-powered LED flash module reference design (pictured below), developed by Seoul Semiconductor, uses a thin, prismatic HA230 CAP-XX supercapacitor and an AnalogicTech AAT1282 LED flash driver (on reverse side) to drive high-current Seoul Semiconductor LEDs. To discuss this module with Seoul Semiconductor, contact Jesper Bennike, Technical Sales and Solution Manager
Mobile: +45 22951550
Office: +45 38887550
Jesper@Seoulsemicon.com
 
CAP-XX FDMS Horizontal Picture Enhanced
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The supercapacitor-powered LED flash module reference design (pictured below right), developed by ON Semiconductor, uses a thin CAP-XX HA230 supercapacitor (on the underside) and the ON Semiconductor NCP5680 flash driver to drive high-current Lumileds LEDs. Also pictured (left) for comparison is the Nokia N82 xenon flash solution with its large, cylindrical electrolytic capacitor.
 
Comparison Of N82 Xenon And ON Semi Flash Module
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BriteFlash™ in Action

To demonstrate the increased flash power and ease of design-in, CAP-XX engineers retrofitted several industry-leading camera phones with the BriteFlash™ solution. In this phone, CAP-XX added a ~1.2mm thick dual-cell supercapacitor [highlighted in red], replaced existing LEDs with 4 high-powered LEDs that can each handle a peak pulse current of 1A, then put the phone together again with no change in external appearance. The original phone delivered 1 watt of flash power for 160 milliseconds while the CAP-XX-modified phone delivered 15 watts for the same amount of time.

CAP-XX Supercap Cell Phone Demo
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CAP-XX placed two supercapacitor cells and four replacement LEDs in a leading-brand camera phone to demonstrate its flash power. The photos below were taken using the unmodified phone on the left and the CAP-XX-modified phone on the right. The unmodified phone delivered 1W of flash power for 160ms while the modified phone delivered 15W of flash power for 160ms.

Flash photo taken with unmodified cell phone Flash photo taken with CAP-XX-modified cell phone
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The graph below shows the Battery Current, LED Current, and Supercapacitor Voltage during a flash pulse and supercapacitor recharge after the pulse. Note that the Battery Current never exceeds 300mA even though the flash pulse is 4A. The supercapacitor provides the 3.7A difference.

CAP-XX Flash Current Chart
 
 

High Power LED Supercapacitor Solution Reference Design

BriteFlash Reference Design
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BriteSound™ Power Architecture for Music Phones


Pump up the volume! Supercapacitors enhance audio quality and power in mobile phones.

As multimedia and music phones grow in popularity, consumers want an iPod-quality audio experience without the buzzing and distortion associated with wireless transmissions. In the BriteSound™ power architecture, CAP-XX supercapacitors double audio power for richer-sounding music and handle peak power demands to eliminate distortion during wireless transmissions.


Audio Quality Problems in Music Phones
Typically, a standard 3.6-volt battery powers two class D amplifiers to drive a pair of 8-ohm speakers.
For the problems with this typical set-up, see white paper.
Typical configuration for class D amplifier
Fig 1: Typical configuration for class D amplifier

 

Managing Mobile Phone Audio Power with a Supercapacitor

In the BriteSound™ power architecture, a 2.4mm-thin, 0.55-farad, 85-milliohm dual-cell CAP-XX HS206 supercapacitor delivers 5W power-bursts to drive peak-power functions such as audio and LED Flash.

A battery covers the phone's average audio power needs of 0.5 to 1W, recharging the supercapacitor between bursts. This leaves enough battery power to handle data transfers and network polls without compromising audio power, eliminating both the distortion and "clicks" normally heard.

The supercapacitor powers the audio amplifier at 5 volts, compared to 3.6 volts directly from a battery, thereby doubling peak audio power for full-sounding music with a strong bass beat.

The supercapacitor also reduces noise by supplying peak power with less voltage droop than the battery would, and eliminates any 217Hz buzz when a GSM/GPRS/EDGE phone transmits by protecting the audio amplifier from other peak loads the battery supplies such as the RF Power Amplifier.

Because the supercapacitor supplies high-peak currents, designers can use higher-quality 4-ohm instead of standard 8-ohm speakers, further doubling peak audio power.

Class D amplifier with supercapacitor
Fig 2: Class D amplifier with supercapacitor

 

Tests Comparing Mobile-Phone Audio Quality and Power

CAP-XX used three cases for comparing audio quality and power, testing typical mobile-phone audio circuits both with and without a supercapacitor. To test the difference in power that 4-ohm versus 8-ohm speakers would make, CAP-XX simulated the effect by attaching a second set of identical 8-ohm speakers in the supercapacitor-powered set-ups.

To test a bass beat and a network poll, CAP-XX built 2 test circuits each with two class D audio amplifiers, one powered by a battery to drive a pair of 8-ohm speakers, the other supported by a supercapacitor to drive two pairs of 8-ohm speakers.


Bass Beat

CAP-XX used a 100Hz bass beat lasting 120 milliseconds repeated every 0.5 seconds to test speaker power and battery current. The supercapacitor tripled peak audio power from 1.65W to 5.2W for fuller-sounding music. Test results are shown below in Table 1 and Figures 3 and 4. For more technical details,
see white paper.

 

Mobile phone with and without supercapacitor

 

Bass beat, no supercapacitor
Fig 3: Bass beat, no supercapacitor

 

Bass beat with supercapacitor
Fig 4: Bass beat with supercapacitor

 

Network Poll

CAP-XX simulated a GSM/GPRS/EDGE network poll while listening to music by applying a two-amp, 1.15-millisecond power pulse while the audio amplifier was playing a 1KHz tone. The supercapacitor protected the audio amplifier from the battery voltage droop, eliminating distortion during wireless transmission. Test results are shown below in Figures 5 and 6. For more technical details,
see white paper.

 

Distortion in audio when battery needs to supply peak current
Fig 5: Distortion in audio when battery needs to supply peak current for audio + RF PA.

 

Supercapacitor buffers the audio amp from battery voltage droop
Fig 6: Supercapacitor buffers the audio amp from battery voltage droop during the RF transmit pulse, so there is no audio distortion

 

Listening to a Piece of Music

CAP-XX used a set of SonyEricsson MPS60 external speakers and audio amplifier as a test bed. Engineers modified one set with a supercapacitor charged to 5V to power the audio amplifier, then connected a second pair of 8-ohm speakers to the original pair. Figures 7 and 8 below show the modifications.

The company played a piece of music to compare the unmodified MPS60 to the supercapacitor-powered one. The supercapacitor-modified setup more than doubled peak audio power from 2.24W to 4.96W, so music sounded fuller and richer. Test results are shown below in Figures 9 and 10 and Table 2. For more technical details, see white paper.

 

External audio amplifier, powered from the phone
Fig 7: External audio amplifier, powered from the phone, modified to include a supercapacitor

 

Modified external speaker set
Fig 8: Modified external speaker set including a second pair of speakers
connected in parallel to the original pair.


Figures 9 & 10 compare battery current and speaker power between the standard set of speakers and our modified set for a piece of music.

Battery current and speaker power while playing music, standard setup
Fig 9: Battery current and speaker power while playing music, standard setup
driving 2 x 8 speakers with audio amp powered from Vbatt.

 

Battery current and speaker power while playing music, modified setup
Fig 10: Battery current and speaker power while playing music, modified setup
driving 4 x 8 speakers with audio amp powered from a supercapacitor at 5V.

 

Mobile phone with and without supercapacitor

 

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